Terminologies: “Traditional Marriage”

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In this material, this section should be the only section that incorporates the term “Traditional Marriage” which means that I do not intend to incorporate this term anywhere else within this material. What follows is my explanation as to why I refrain from using this term.

For several reasons, I have chosen to not use the term “Traditional Marriage” when referring to “marriage” (a reference to the definition of marriage, which will be found in “Considering Lingual Aspects of the English”).

Instead, I have chosen to use the term SCECS Accepted Marriage, which conveys the idea of a State licensed marriage.

Why?

I have expressed that families and entities within SCECS are vastly diverse.

Therefore, the way I would choose to define, develop, and understand a “Traditional Marriage” and/or identify the accountabilities and responsibilities within a “Traditional Marriage” is not necessarily the way in which a family and/or an entity within SCECS would choose to define, develop, and understand a “Traditional Marriage” and/or identify the accountabilities and responsibilities within a “Traditional Marriage”.

For instance, for some, a “Traditional Marriage” is when the father finds a man for his daughter; for others it requires the prospective male to ask her father for permission; yet others might require the ceremony to be in a Church or that the vows are officiated by a minister.

Therefore, when a family and/or entity within SCECS speaks of a “Traditional Marriage” the family and/or the entity is using the term “Traditional Marriage” according to:

  • where the family and/or entity is located within human history;
  • the family’s and/or entity’s ideologies, philosophies, and/or theologies;
  • how the family and/or entity defines, develops, and understands the term “Traditional Marriage”; and
  • how the family and/or entity identifies the accountabilities and responsibilities within “Traditional Marriage”.

In essence, definitions and examples of “Traditional Marriage” can be as varied as the families and the entities within SCECS.

With those things in mind, I coined the term SCECS Accepted Marriage, in order to write about ‘marriage’ (the personal relationship) while trying to avoid presumptives about definitions, developments, understandings, accountabilities, and/or responsibilities.

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