AAOTW: Comparing the SCECS AM to the PC

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Anthropological Aspects of the West:
Comparing the SCECS Accepted Marriage
to the Private Contract

 
Throughout Western History, man and woman have successfully navigated their personal relationship.

However, when they decide to obtain the SCECS Accepted Marriage, they permit the families and entities within SCECS to become the active, controlling, governing, third partner of their personal relationship.

Stated another way, man and woman have successfully navigated the realms of the informal Private Contract throughout history.

If they hit a bump, they go to someone they trust, they receive advice. Then, each determines to continue their informal Private Contract, or one or the other decides to terminate their informal Private Contract and settle out their differences.

How is the informal Private Contract any different than a formalized Private Contract?

None, until individuals of the personal relationship want to become participants in the SCECS Accepted Marriage.

How?

The families and entities within SCECS are the Electorate. The Electorate elects State officials. The State officials govern the SCECS Accepted Marriage.

Thus, through the State, the families and entities within SCECS become the active, controlling, governing third party of the SCECS Accepted Marriage, having the power to define, develop, understand, and assign accountabilities and responsibilities to the participants of the SCECS Accepted Marriage.

As counterpoint, some might claim that which has become the SCECS Accepted Marriage functionally represents the desires of each family of the participants in the SCECS Accepted Marriage.

However, since it seems certain that the current SCECS debate will continue for the foreseeable future about the definitions, developments, understandings, accountabilities, and responsibilities of the personal relationship, then that heated debate and divisive discord seems to adequately establish that many (most?) modern individuals and families within SCECS have not been given the concept that the SCECS Accepted Marriage is not the only method of governing the personal relationship.

While currently not the normative, the Private Contract is fully capable of governing a personal relationship.

The Private Contract conveys that other individuals, families, and entities within SCECS have no authority to impose their personal preferences or belief structure upon someone else’s Private Contract.

Why?

Because the personal relationship is private. In it’s very natural state that which is private is governed by a Private Contract.

Therefore, the Private Contract is in contrast to the SCECS Accepted Marriage.

In the SCECS Accepted Marriage other individuals, families, and entities within SCECS have the ability to become the active, controlling, governing third party, involved in defining, developing, understanding, or assigning accountabilities and/or responsibilities of the personal relationship.

In the Private Contract other individuals, families, and entities within SCECS do NOT have the ability to become the active, controlling, governing third party, involved in defining, developing, understanding, or assigning accountabilities and/or responsibilities of the personal relationship.

In other words, in the Private Contract the only individuals who have the power to define, develop, give understanding, or assign accountabilities and/or responsibilities of the personal relationship is those specific individuals within that Private Contract.

Lastly, because the privacy of the personal relationship demands a Private Contract, the manner in which families and entities within SCECS hotly debate the SCECS Accepted Marriage reveals that the SCECS Accepted Marriage is wholly non-private.

Why?

Because, unlike the Private Contract, the SCECS Accepted Marriage is influenced by families and entities within SCECS, working as the Electorate who elect the officials to the State which act as an active, controlling, governing third-party to the SCECS Accepted Marriage.

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