CLAOTE: Modern Definitions

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Considering Lingual Aspects of the English:
Modern Definitions of the English term “husband” and the English term “wife”

 
In discussing why I moved from the SCECS Accepted Marriage to a Private Contract, I want to spend some time looking at two specific English term “husband” and the English term “wife”.

Without doubt, here in modernity, it is nearly impossible not to utilize the primary definition of each word, and it feels absurd to provide the definitions of these two words, but I am going to provide the definitions and discuss some aspects of those terms.

According to Dictionary.com, the primary definition of the English term “husband” is: “a married man, especially when considered in relation to his partner in marriage.” [1]

According to Dictionary.com, the primary definition of the English term “wife” is: “a married woman, especially when considered in relation to her partner in marriage.”[2]

Those definitions seem fairly definitive.

However, they are not as definitive as one might want, and that is because each definition uses the word “partner” and the word “marriage”.

Before I discuss the definitions for the term “partner” and the term “marriage” it seems proper to state that for this material, I aim to continue using double-quotation marks for “marriage” in order for my reader to differentiate from my other use of the same word, which means that when I use the term “marriage” I am referring back to the use of the term “marriage” within the definition for the English term “husband” and the English term “wife”.

According to Dictionary.com, the primary definition of partner is: “a person who shares or is associated with another in some action or endeavor; sharer; associate.”[3]

According to Dictionary.com, the primary definition of marriage is: “(broadly) any of the diverse forms of interpersonal union established in various parts of the world to form a familial bond that is recognized legally, religiously, or socially, granting the participating partners mutual conjugal rights and responsibilities and including, for example, opposite-sex marriage, same-sex marriage, plural marriage, and arranged marriage”.[4]

I am being thorough to show several specifics.

One, currently the English term “husband” is still being defined as “a married man”.

Additionally, currently the English term “wife” is still being defined as “a married woman”.

Two, the current definition for the English term “husband” and the current definition for the English term “wife” do not have to be the primary definition, because of the additional phraseology that accompanies both terms, that phrasing being “especially when considered in relation to [his/her] partner in marriage.”

Three, a “partner” can be any person, a masculine individual or a feminine individual, as long as they are one “who shares or is associated with another [person] in some action or endeavor”.

Four, the current definition of “marriage” in properly, broadly, inclusive to refer to all types of “marriage” that are found throughout the world.

Therefore, when one reads the primary definition of the English term “husband” and/or the primary definition of the English term “wife” how that person interprets those definitions depends upon many factors.

Why?

It depends, in part, upon how each person personally defines and uses those terms.

For instance, consider that Dictionary.com conveys the term “husband” and the term “wife” have additional definitions.

An additional definition of “husband” is “The dominant, masculine member of a homosexual couple, [whether] male or female”.[5]

An additional definition of “wife” is “The more passive of a homosexual couple”.[6]

I am not disputing the above definitions.

Instead, I recognize that the above definitions are the functional definitions of our time.

That means it doesn’t matter how I would define “husband” or “wife” what matters is how those terms are understood by the broad-based spectrum of people, in other words those families and entities that are within SCECS.

What needs to be understood is that a “husband” and a “wife” whether in an opposite-sex marriage, or in a same-sex marriage, or a plural-marriage “form a familial bond that is recognized legally, religiously, or socially, granting the participating partners mutual conjugal rights and responsibilities”.

Therefore, how a “husband” and a “wife” is further defined depends upon the sphere in which the term “husband” and “wife” occur.

For instance, the legal definition of the English “husband” might not be the same as a religious definition.

Another example, is that a social definition of the English term “wife” might not be the legal definition.

Those examples convey that a social definition might not be a religious definition.

These definitional realities make the discussion about the definitions, developments, and understanding of the term “husband” and the term “wife” along with the term “partner” and the term “marriage” and determining associated accountabilities and responsibilities as they relate to the SCECS Accepted Marriage, not only difficult, but also confrontational.

 
Footnotes:
[1] Husband – the primary (first) definition as defined under the Noun; May 5, 2017; http://www.dictionary.com/browse/husband.

[2] Wife – the primary (first) definition as defined under the Noun; May 5, 2017; http://www.dictionary.com/browse/wife.

[3] Partner – the primary (first) definition as defined under the Noun; May 5, 2017; http://www.dictionary.com/browse/partner.

[4] Marriage – the primary (first) definition as defined under the Noun; May 5, 2017; http://www.dictionary.com/browse/marriage.

[5] Husband as defined under “Slang definitions & phrases for husband” on May 5, 2017; http://www.dictionary.com/browse/husband.

[6] Wife as defined under “Slang definitions & phrases for wife” on May 5, 2017; http://www.dictionary.com/browse/wife.

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