Thoughts about the NT, PR, & PC: The Complexity of Matthew 19.1-12

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Thoughts about the New Testament, Personal Relationship, and Private Contract:
The Complexity of Matthew 19.1-12 Leads To
Discussion, Disagreement, and Dispute

 
As I go through this section: Thoughts about the New Testament, Personal Relationship and Private Contract, I want to begin with Matthew 19.1-12.

I will offer some thoughts regarding that passage, and then make some additional notes throughout the remainder of this section regarding the New Testament, the personal relationship, and the Private Contract.

 
Matthew 19.1-12 is a passage that has received many discussions and debates.

As much as the church wants to say the debate about “marriage” and divorce was settled by Jesus, the evidence shows us that Jesus’ teaching did not settle the dispute because the dispute rages on.

Why?

Because Jesus’ teaching in Matthew 19.1-12 about the personal relationship is complex.

Jesus’ teaching is interwoven not only with Genesis and the Law of Moses but also the historic permissions permitted to the Israelites for the personal relationship and the Israelite system that was current to Jesus’ day.

While some may deny the following because it will be contrary to what some might want to portray, it is not easy to understand Matthew 19.1-12.

Why?

Because that passage is more complex than we want it to be.

That complexity makes it difficult for us to discuss and determine what Jesus intended not only in that passage but also in his other teachings about the personal relationship.

Yet, without doubt there are eternal principles that are within Matthew 19.1-12.

Like the eternal principle that Jesus is clearly teaching that the personal relationship is serious business and should not to be taken lightly.

That leads to another eternal principle, because the personal relationship should be serious, the personal relationship should not end for just any reason.

However, disputes continue to arise about what constitutes proper circumstances to put asunder (terminate) the personal relationship.

Importantly, it should be recognized that some teach that the personal relationship should never be terminated.

My personal study on this topic reveals that God does not desire for the personal relationship to be terminated by any avenue other than a person’s natural death.

My personal study on this topic reveals that the same thing applies to Jesus.

However, that is the ideal, the ideal being that the personal relationship lasts from start to finish, being completed, finished, when one of them dies by natural death.

But, for whatever reason, for some the ideal cannot be.

For example, natural death is reaching the end of one’s life span, like old age.

That means that the personal relationship can end via unnatural death, like death during war, or death via car accident, or any other number of unnatural deaths.

Therefore does God permit a personal relationship to be terminated through unnatural death? Yes.

Therefore does God permit a personal relationship to be terminated through the unnatural death of putting asunder? Yes.

Does God like that humans terminate their personal relationships by putting asunder? No.

Does God accept that humans terminate their personal relationships by putting asunder? Yes.

Does termination of a personal relationship by putting asunder cause eternal damnation? No.

That actual situation sets uncomfortable with those who want to limit the ability of individuals to terminate their personal relationship by putting asunder.

They could even postulate assertions as to why I am incorrect. Yet, what I have stated is nevertheless true.

That means that as much as the church wants to believe that the termination of the personal relationship by putting asunder was settled, the discussion about putting asunder is as earnestly contested now as it was earnestly contested back in Jesus’ day.

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