Thoughts about the NT, PR, & PC: Rom. 13.1, 1 Cor. 7.20, 7.21 – In Relation To The SCECS A.M., PR, & PC

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Thoughts about the New Testament, Personal Relationship, and Private Contract:
Romans 13.1, 1 Corinthians 7.20, and 1 Corinthians 7.21 – In Relation To The SCECS Accepted Marriage, The Personal Relationship, And The Private Contract

 
Considering all that I have discussed here in this section: Thoughts about the New Testament, Personal Relationship, and Private Contract, I know that there will be those believers who will still appeal to Romans 13.1.

In some instances, that appeal will be done to order to show disapproval of the manner in which some choose to govern their personal relationship.

That disapproval uses social guilt, and peer-pressure to shame someone into following the path of the SCECS Accepted Marriage.

So what is my personal response to that appeal?

First, for those who use the Private Contract to govern their personal relationship, they should feel no shame, no guilt, and not give in to peer-pressure.

Why?

Because in the United States, individuals are still able to govern themselves.

Second, in the United States, the State is governed by the Electorate that embodies the vastness of SCECS.

That means that while the Electorate directs the movement of the State, in the United States, one member of the Electorate is free to think and do differently than another member of the Electorate, where both affect and influence the State.

That is the beauty of the United States.

Lastly, I appeal to the same writer of Romans, where that writer also stated “Let every man abide in the same calling where he was called.” (1 Corinthians 7.20 KJV)

I am utilizing that verse to explain an important principle.

It should be understood that back when Mary and I were getting ready for the “marriage” ceremony that would place us under the legal document of the SCECS Accepted Marriage, it was the families and entities within SCECS who “called” Mary and me into the SCECS Accepted Marriage by compelling us to utilize the license/certificate of the SCECS Accepted Marriage.

Those families and entities never mentioned to us that she and I could use a Private Contract to govern our personal relationship.

It is my preference to assume that occurred because the families and entities did not know or understand that a Private Contract could govern a personal relationship.

So, by the guidance provided by others, Mary and I were lead to the SCECS Accepted Marriage, and as such we were “called” to participate in the SCECS Accepted Marriage, which is governed by the certificate/license, which serves as a legal document binding participants to the SCECS Accepted Marriage.

So consider that the same writer also said “…but if thou mayest be made free, use it rather.” (1 Corinthians 7.21 KJV)

Again, I am utilizing another verse to explain an important principle.

So think of Mary and me going into the SCECS Accepted Marriage this way:
for a familial, financial, legal, and social price, we bound ourselves to “marriage” as governed by the SCECS Accepted Marriage (in the similitude of 1 Corinthians 7.20);
and
for a familial, financial, legal, and social price, we divorced ourselves from “marriage” as governed by the SCECS Accepted Marriage (in the similitude of 1 Corinthians 7.21).

That means:
for a price, we were bound to the governance provided by the license/certificate of the SCECS Accepted Marriage (1 Corinthians 7.20)
until
we learned that for a price, we could obtain freedom from the governance that is provided by the license/certificate of the SCECS Accepted Marriage (1 Corinthians 7.21).

Stated another way, we had to learn that we could formally terminate our association with the constraints and limitations of the SCECS Accepted Marriage, in order to seek and obtain the liberty to define, develop, understand, and give accountability and responsibility to our own personal relationship through a Private Contract.

Different. In some ways more difficult, but freedom and liberty are rarely easy.

Importantly, the governance of our personal relationship is now back within our own personal control.

In other words, we learned that anthropological Western history and Biblical history reveal the diverseness of the personal relationship and the Private Contract, and we sought and secured freedom so we could develop a means to personally govern our personal relationship.

That means upon terminating our SCECS Accepted Marriage, we obtained our freedom from being governed by the legal document of the SCECS Accepted Marriage.

That means Mary and I now have the liberty, the freedom, and the ability to develop, define, understand, and assign accountabilities and responsibilities which will directly shape the direction of our personal relationship without any constraints, directions, encumbrances, influences, and/or limitations from others.

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